Alsace

2019/09/14-17: Peaceful days in Rosheim
Our friend, Matthias, would be away for the weekend and was working during the week. Having been a long-term traveller, he understood we needed quiet time, and for this his house was lovely. We did errands of various kinds, and were happy to spend time with him in the evenings. We were also privileged to get to know his mother, Denise.

Matthias and Margo

On Saturday after laundry, bike maintenance, and errands, we returned to find that Denise had delivered a home made cake! We had just eaten our first mille-feuilles pastries in the village to celebrate our arrival in France, so we didn’t immediately tuck into the cake, but shared it with her the next day over tea when she came by again.

Rosheim
Mont Ste. Odile

On Monday evening, Matthias drove us to the top of Mont Ste. Odile for a visit to the convent, and a panoramic view of Alsace countryside.

On Tuesday, rather than cycle to shops, we explored Rosheim on foot, walking around the the town’s old walls and seeing the restored lavoire. We bought Linzer torte and invited Denise for tea again. She came after her daily brisk Nordic walk. Denise was born in 1938, and shared her memories of the final days of the war in occupied Alsace with us. In the evening, we had a lovely Alsacienne meal in Obernai with Matthias.

Obernai

2019/09/18: To Breisach, 82 km
We set out toward Breisach before Matthias left for work, our panniers stocked with his home grown apples. For much of the ride, we followed a disused branch of the Rhône to Rhine canal, with a newly paved path cycle path beside it. The water was shallow because most of the disused locks were left open, and much of the channel was somewhat overgrown. We didn’t see any paddle craft, but it looked ideal for a quiet canoe trip.

The Rhine crossing near Marckolsheim took us back into Germany past a hydro project and two sets of locks: One for larger, another for smaller craft. Continuing on the east bank, we passed an elementary school group. I distinctly heard both German and French being used. Surely it’s only logical to have bilingual or immersion programs along a border.

M

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